Thursday, January 18, 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Found: Two New Drawings by Vincent van Gogh



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Found: Two New Drawings by Vincent van Gogh
// Atlas Obscura - Latest Articles and Places

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In 1886 and 1887, Vincent van Gogh lived with his beloved brother Theo in an apartment in Montmartre, Paris's iconic hilltop neighborhood famous at the time for its vibrant art scene. That's where he composed a series of works in which he depicted rural subjects such as windmills and vegetable gardens, as well as views of the city skyline that he could see from his window. Thanks to new research from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, we can now add two more works to the Postimpressionist's Montmartre period.

Hill of Montmartre with Stone Quarry, a 1886 sketch of Paris's heights with a quarry below, was acquired by the Van Vlissingen Art Foundation in 2014. Four years on, experts from the Van Gogh Museum have confirmed that the drawing indeed came from his hand. This, in turn, helped to authenticate another sketch, The Hill of Montmartre, which was held at the museum but had previously been rejected as a Van Gogh—partly because it was so unlike his other work. "It is fantastic news that two drawings can now definitively be added to Van Gogh's oeuvre," said museum director Axel Rüger, in a press release.

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The drawings, which will be featured in a upcoming exhibition at the Singer Laren Museum in the Netherlands, display strong similarities in terms of subject, size, style, technique, and materials. As the Van Gogh Museum's Teio Meedendorp explained in the release, they were composed when the artist was still practicing with traditional techniques—before finding his distinctive style. "They demonstrate a phase in Van Gogh's learning process—in Paris, he rediscovered himself, but here, he was still following the traditional artistic path."


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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Links from class 1/16/18

Kay Neilsen
Stabiles
Chicago bean
Claes Oldenberg

"Flow" Diagram
Image result for flow diagram mihaly csikszentmihalyi

Fwd: darrencalvert: People often say to me: “You draw like some kind...


-nate


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Nate Marcel <greatseamonster@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, Jan 14, 2018 at 11:53 PM
Subject: darrencalvert: People often say to me: "You draw like some kind...
To: greatseamonster@gmail.com




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darrencalvert: People often say to me: "You draw like some kind...
// Art and Reference point













darrencalvert:

People often say to me: "You draw like some kind of inhuman machine.  If I eat your brain, will I gain your power?"  The answer is yes, but there is another way.

The key to precise drawing is building up muscle memory so that your arm/hand/fingers do the things you want them to do when you want them to do them.  Teaching yourself to draw a straight line or to make sweet curves is just a matter of practice and there are some exercises you can do to help improve.

If you're going to be doodling in class or during meetings anyway, why not put that time to good use?


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“You HAVE to Make a CHOICE: Am I Going to SHOW UP?” - Brené Brown (@Bren...

Monday, January 15, 2018

Bald Mountain Art



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Bald Mountain Art
// Deja View




A few pieces of art from "Night on Bald Mountain" that were sold by Heritage Auctions last year.
This segment from Fantasia remains animations' most nightmarish, astounding, horrific and beautiful moment.
Between Kay Nielsen's concepts and Bill Tytla's extraordinary animation, on top of the brilliant Mussorgsky's composition, there is a visual power that has not been matched in this medium since. Sheer terror without an ounce of comedy for balance.
Not every sequence in Fantasia came "together" in terms of story, animation and color, but Night on Bald Mountain is one of those cinematic achievements that is absolutely perfect. It went all the way, nothing is compromised in its presentation. It is a benchmark for what animation could do in 1940, and a reminder of the power of Drawn Animation.










Check out this previous post on Chernabog:




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More Ken O'Brien Roughs



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More Ken O'Brien Roughs
// Deja View




I've written about animator Ken O'Brien before. On Lady & the Tramp he had the ungrateful task of bringing the human characters of Jim Dear and Darling to life. They were both based on live action reference, and a lesser animator might have ruined such an assignment.
But O'Brien knew very well how to work best with that kind of reference. He altered the poses from the live action quite a bit by strengthening body rhythm and overall movement. His drawing and animation is sort of a healthy mix of Fred Moore and Milt Kahl.
Look at the image above, he handled those 3/4 rear vews with such ease! I find myself working that kind of an angle on characters over and over. Its not easy, but look at O'Brien's approach! Intuitive and perfect.










Go here for previous posts on the talented Ken O'Brien:





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Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Links from Class 1/10/18

The Natural Way to Draw
The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain
Show Your Work




Seeing the blind contour | Ian Sklarsky | TEDxCapeTown

https://youtu.be/hEM_vaK2ddc


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Intricate Pen Drawings Bring to Life the Fluffiest Kitties You’ll Ever See



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Intricate Pen Drawings Bring to Life the Fluffiest Kitties You'll Ever See
// Brown Paper Bag

Fluffy cat art by Kamwei Fong

At the end of December 2017, I shared 15 works of cat art celebrating my beloved weekly tradition: #Caturday. One of my favorite kitties on that list was a delightful drawing by Kamwei Fong. It featured a black-and-white portrait of a cat (directly below) done in an intricate mark-making style. With only a set of beady eyes visible among masses of fur, Kamwei created the distinct feeling that the feline is too fuzzy for its own good. This characteristic, it turns out, is a reoccurring theme in his work; part of The Furry Thing series, the same characteristics are seen in several types of cats. The visual similarities make the illustrations easily collectible, and Kamwei has them for sale on Etsy. In addition to his online shop, Kamwei also shares work in progress through Instagram.

Fluffy cat art by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

Fluffy cat illustration by Kamwei Fong

The post Intricate Pen Drawings Bring to Life the Fluffiest Kitties You'll Ever See appeared first on Brown Paper Bag.


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With or Without Background?



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With or Without Background?
// Muddy Colors

Cover for "Spidey".Marvel Comics 2016.
Could this cover have improved with a background or did it really have everything it needs to portray the idea?

I have to admit that I was never a fan of drawing backgrounds. I've work hard to learn the rules of perspective and everything involved in the process of creating a believable environment for my characters, but I was always more interested in the figure drawing.

It's not out of laziness, I swear. I love drawing and painting and I've never shied away from hard work (At least when it comes to art; If you need help moving furniture, I may show up late) but It's hard for me to get eager about drawing a background.

If I feel like the image needs it, that the background tells an important aspect of the story I'm illustrating and helps the narrative, I do it without a blink but, luckily for me, comic book covers, and specially Superheroes comic book covers, are very character driven and, most of the times, a background won't add much to the cover.

On top of that, there needs to be room for a code bar, title, credits, and sometimes a tagline so, most of the times, it's better to leave the image as light as you can so it can read well once the trade dress is added.

But what about those times when you do need a background? Well, as anything you do on the page, you better find a way to make it amusing for you. It doesn't mean skipping work, it means working differently. You'll still have to put up time and effort to think about a way to portray the story you want, the way you want.

Cover for "Hawkeye" #12. Marvel Comics 2017.

One of my ways of making it fun is to, whenever I can, working the background as an element of design. This Spider-Men cover is a good example:

Cover for "Spider-Men". Marvel Comics 2017.

Heavily inspired, you may have noticed, in Coles Phillips' work:




Take a look at how much information he's giving us, with so very little drawing. He might not have spent time drawing details, but he sure spent a lot of time designing.

The lack of a full background was very common in the covers of the old paperbacks. I assume this was because of, as previously mentioned, the need for space for the trade dress, but I I'm pretty sure that it was also a clever way to meet the deadlines.

Robert McGinnis

This (above) is a beautiful example. It didn't need more than a silhouette and some circles to convey the idea of a behind the scenes of a TV studio or a movie set.

Mitchell Hooks was a master at this.



Take a look at the cover of "My Man Godfrey" (Above). While the only background is a stair (A banister, actually; he didn't even draw any steps) and a chandelier, he made sure to made it in a way where you can immediately tell it's a mansion. You don't need more than that. Which reminds me of a saying from the old master Alex Toth that could apply here. You probably heard this one before: "Strip it all down to essentials and draw the hell out of what's left.".

Robert McGinnis
Robert McGinnis

If you enjoy drawing backgrounds, and have the time to do it, then draw the hell out of it and knock it out of the park. But if you don't enjoy it much, or the deadline is too tight, you can always come up with clever and interesting ways of providing your characters of an environment and give the reader the info they need. As I've said before: It's not about skipping work, it's about working differently.

I might not be big on drawing backgrounds, but that doesn't mean that I don't enjoy seeing other people do it (I'm not a monster!), so let's end this post with a few samples of wonderful, crowded, beautifully rendered backgrounds.

PS. I'm not lazy!

Bernie Fuchs

Bernie Fuchs

Paolo Rivera

Brian Sanders


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Seth's Blog: Rules for working in a studio

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2017/12/rules-for-working-in-a-studio.html


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