Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Toned Paper Drawings



----
Toned Paper Drawings
// Muddy Colors

by Cory Godbey


As I've been working my way through my 2017 sketchbook, one facet I'm particularly excited to show is the toned paper and white charcoal drawings.

While I've been putting together yearly sketchbooks since 2008 it's only been since 2015 that I've included toned paper drawings and studies in those sketchbooks. Why only since 2015? I have no idea. I really should have been doing this all along because they are a joy to create.

They are relatively quick to do and when that white charcoal hits the paper they really come to life. 

One of these days I'll to do a post on the how and whys of creating annuals sketchbooks on a theme but until then here's a look at some of the finished toned paper drawings from my upcoming 2017 collection. If you're going to be in town for New York Comic-Con I hope you'll stop by and take a look! I'll be debuting the sketchbook and related work at the show in October.


If you, like me up until pretty recently, haven't gotten around to exploring what this medium has to offer, the materials list is nice and simple. Low stakes entry point, well worth experimenting.


I start most all my work with a brown Prismacolor Col-erase. From there I'll lightly work up the drawing switching back and forth between a BiC 0.5 and General's Kimberly 2B. For anything darker I'll go with a General's Kimberly 8B (or 4B). A blending stump can be useful for rendering. Lastly, the white charcoal.

As for paper I usually work with a Strathmore 400 series. I'm sure there are others but this one has always done the trick for me.

And here's a quick look at the progression:



I've found that doing these pieces are great for studies or just taking a thumbnail and working it up into a more respectable idea. This might sound simple and obvious but somehow or another it took me years to get around to putting any real time into the medium. Again, I say all this to say if you, like me until relatively recently, haven't given toned paper a shot, go for it. It's a delight.

These can make for great pieces for collectors and they lend a nice visual variety to a sketchbook.





2017 marks my tenth annual sketchbook. 

Over the last decade I've gone from collecting random drawings done throughout the year to creating an intentional series on theme. One of the major things I've learned in that time is that by creating a framework for yourself, by creating works on theme, you give yourself a world to explore. It's concentrated development. When you take one main idea, one theme, and turn it around in your mind you begin to uncover new possibilities and directions that you might not have thought of otherwise. 

I know that's been the case for me over the last ten year's worth of personal work and toned paper drawings have become an integral part in my creative process.

----

Read in my feedly


Sent from my iPhone

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Frederico Zuccaro brown ink drawing of his brother drawing antique sculptures



----
Frederico Zuccaro brown ink drawing of his brother drawing antique sculptures
// lines and colors

Taddeo Drawing after the Antique; In the Background Copying a Facade by Polidoro, Frederico Zuccaro brown ink drawing of his brother drawing antique sculptures
Taddeo Drawing after the Antique; In the Background Copying a Facade by Polidoro, Federico Zuccaro

Pen and brown ink, brush with brown wash, roughly 17 x 7 inches (42 x 18 cm); in the collection of the Getty Museum, which has both a zoomable and downloadable version of the image.

There is also a somewhat warmer (more reddish brown) reproduction of the drawing available as a zoomable image on the Google Art Project, and a downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons.

It is the second, warmer version of the image that I've used above. Not having see the original, I don't know which is more accurate (museums are not always accurate in the posting of images of work in their collections), so I've simply gone with the version I like better.

This is another in a wonderful series of drawings by 16th century artist Frederico Zuccaro of his elder brother Taddeo drawing from ancient statues in Rome. This was common practice in the way that artists trained, and continues to this day in those art schools and ateliers that hew to the classic or academic training the preceded the advent of modernist doctrine.

I've previously featured two other drawings from this series, here and here, also from the collection of the Getty Museum.

 

----

Read in my feedly


Sent from my iPhone

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Bizarre Occult Art From ‘Der Orchideengarten’, The 1st Fantasy Magazine



----
Bizarre Occult Art From 'Der Orchideengarten', The 1st Fantasy Magazine
// Ultraculture

Bizarre Occult Art From 'Der Orchideengarten', The 1st Fantasy Magazine | Jason Louv | Ultraculture - Unlock Your Magick

Check out this collection of weird and macabre art from Der Orchideengarten, the world's first fantasy magazine

Ultraculture friends Century Guild are Kickstarting a collection of illustrations Der Orchideengarten or The Orchids-garden, the world's first fantasy magazine and a precursor of the legendary Weird Tales.

Among the many authors published by Der Orchideengarten were Voltaire, Guy de Maupassant, Victor Hugo, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allen Poe, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H. G. Wells, E. T. A. Hoffman and many, many more. Featured artists were Gustav Dore, Tony Johannot, Rolf von Hoerschelmann and many of the leading lights of German weird art.

This is an incredible chance to own a truly beautiful piece of the history of weird literature. Some of the book's otherworldly and macabre images are reproduced below.

Via Orchidgarden.store:

Der Orchideengarten is a legendary German supernatural horror magazine published from January 1919 until November 1921.

The Orchid Garden: Diabolical Fantasia thoroughly covers a carefully curated selection of magnificent and macabre illustrations from the issues published in 1919.

Founded four years before the iconic American magazine Weird Tales launched in March 1923, Der Orchideengarten is considered to be the first fantasy magazine.


Published after the First World War when German art was at its height of decadence and debauchery, the magazine included a wide selection of new and reprinted stories by both German-language and foreign writers ranging from suspense and terror to crime and the eerily-erotic.

While the literary content is historically significant, many of the stories have been reprinted in multiple places across the last century; we have focused our attention on what has gone undocumented: the incredible artworks that illustrated these stories.

The artworks range from peculiar medieval etchings to occult woodblocks to expressionist visions- all balancing the romantic and the gothic with hyper-elegant sophistication.Der Orchideengarten gets mentioned frequently on blogs, at fantasy conventions, and at certain full-moon cauldron gatherings, but the same low-resolution images get shared over and over again. This book is an opportunity to explore the 1919 publication in depth, with high resolution scans made from a pristine collection!

For nearly 20 years, Century Guild has devoted itself to building and presenting an archive of important artworks that define the origins of popular culture. We've prepared the materials, and by pre-ordering a copy and spreading the word, you can help us make a documentation of this very rare and very obscure magazine come to life.

You can see the promo site for the project, which includes the Kickstarter information, here!

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

RELATED: 9 Stunning, Otherworldly Art Masterpieces by Max Ernst

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

RELATED: The Strange Life of Austin Osman Spare, Chaos Magician

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

Orchid Garden Der Orchideengarten

Check out the Kickstarter here!
 

Follow us on Facebook and at @ultracultblog


----

Read in my feedly


Sent from my iPhone

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Tweet by Giuseppe Castellano on Twitter

Giuseppe Castellano (@pinocastellano)
The beginning of an illustration or manuscript is a gauntlet of doubt, fear, and irrationality.

Push through. It's not as bad as you think.

Download the Twitter app


Sent from my iPhone

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Tweet by G. Willow Wilson on Twitter

G. Willow Wilson (@GWillowWilson)
Every artist I've worked with cites horses as the most painfully difficult thing to draw. (I've removed them from scripts!) This is cool. twitter.com/OhMyMangos/sta…

Download the Twitter app


Sent from my iPhone

Friday, August 4, 2017

Tweet by Haggard Hawks on Twitter

Haggard Hawks (@HaggardHawks)
STIGMATYPY is the use of dots to create an illusion of light and shade. pic.twitter.com/wothtPE2Yd

Download the Twitter app


Sent from my iPhone

Sunday, July 30, 2017

July 2017 Tutorial Roundup!



Sent from my iPhone

A night to remember



----
A night to remember
// Gustaf Tenggren

As mentioned already, on June 22nd Gustaf Tenggren was inducted as a member of Society of Illustrator's Hall of Fame at a Ceremony held in the premises of the club on128 East 63rd Street in New York. 
Society of Illustrator's prize reception dinner on June 22nd, 2017. The walls are covered with art from Stephen Korshak's collection of illustration art, here including two works by Gustaf Tenggren.
(All photos in this blog post except for the Tenggren paintings by Jason Goodfriend, courtesy of the Society of Illustrators.)
For once, the event reception was held in the exhibition area, which turned out to provide a spectacular environment for the venue, hosting parts of Stephen Korshak's amazing collection of illustration art as it was. Very appropriately, two works by Gustaf Tenggren were included in the show, both of which from his early artist years. 

Gustaf Tenggren: Trolls walking downhill, 1915. 
Gustaf Tenggren: Witch. From Bland Tomtar och Troll, 1922.
Receiving the award on behalf of Gustaf Tenggren was Barbara Wells Fitzgerald, daughter of Gustaf's younger brother, Gunnar. Her son Christopher and Nhu Tran accompanied her at the event. 
Gustaf Tenggren's niece Barbra Wells Fitzgerald,
her son Cristopher Wells and Nhu Tran on the Hall of Fame red carpet. 
Barbra Wells Fitzgerald sharing her memories of
her uncle Gustaf Tenggren to the reception audience.
Barbra Wells Fitzgerald and Cristopher Wells holding the awards.
Gustaf Tenggren sure was in good company: the other illustrators awarded in 2017 were:
  • Mort Drucker
  • Bart Forbes
  • Burne Hogarth
  • Anita Kunz
  • George Petty
  • Ralph Steadman

From the impressive list of awardees, three were present at the reception. Ralph Steadman, who had provided the event logo, could unfortunately not make it but was participating through a video. 

Ralph Steadman, participating through a video link, holding the symbols of the event. 
Anita Kunz
Bart Forbes
Anita Kunz and Bart Forbes both held acceptance speeches to the audience from the stand, while the reception's grand old man, Mort Drucker, preferred to thank for the award more briefly. After all, this gentleman, born in 1929, is in his right to go easy after a 60-year career as a cartoonist.
Legendary MAD illustrator and Hall of Fame awardee Mort Drucker
enjoying the company at the Society of Illustrator's prize ceremony.
All in all, this induction ceremony consolidated Gustaf Tenggren's repute as one of the important early New York illustrators during the years when the Society of Illustrator were still in its bud. I'm so happy that his niece Barbara was able to attend the venue, accepting the prize on his behalf. It would have made him proud, entitling himself an artist as he always was throughout his career. 

----

Read in my feedly


Sent from my iPhone

Eye Candy for Today: Watteau chalk studies



----
Eye Candy for Today: Watteau chalk studies
// lines and colors

Two Studies of the Head and Shoulders of a Little Girl, Antoine Watteau, trois crayon drawing, black, red and white chalk on buff paper
Two Studies of the Head and Shoulders of a Little Girl, Antoine Watteau

Black, red and white chalk on buff paper, roughy 7 x 10 inches (19 x 25 cm); in the collection of the Morgan Library and Museum. Use the Zoom feature or download link.

Watteau was noted for his "trois crayon" drawings, in which black, red and white chalks are used on toned paper, usually buff or cream, to great effect in quickly rendering figures or faces.

Here, he has succinctly captured the likeness of his subject with gestural lines, a bit of hatching for shading and some quickly noted white highlights. For all of their simplicity, the drawings have a remarkable presence.

 

----

Read in my feedly


Sent from my iPhone