Sunday, January 31, 2016

Tweet by Lost Drawings on Twitter

Lost Drawings (@LostDrawings)

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"Details are dangerous [in drawing], because an overabundance of details is a bad thing. It’s like..." [feedly]



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"Details are dangerous [in drawing], because an overabundance of details is a bad thing. It's like..."
// Quotes About Comics

"Details are dangerous [in drawing], because an overabundance of details is a bad thing. It's like filling the page just because it's there, or feeling that because you put in a lot of details, you're doing a wonderful job, but that's wrong. Details must take into account the natural rhythm of the eye, like breathing. Details must follow the flow of the story and accentuate its strong moments. Details are like background music in an orchestra. You have the violins and the brass and you must play with all these like a conductor to control the mood of the reader as he reads the story."

- Moebius (Jean Giraud), from the essays in the back of "Silver Surfer: Parable" (1998 edition)

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Lie in ruin, Gustav Klimt [feedly]



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Lie in ruin, Gustav Klimt
// this isn't happiness.








© Wien Museum

Lie in ruin, Gustav Klimt


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Lost Drawings (@LostDrawings)

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Friday, January 29, 2016

Tweet by Jorge González on Twitter

Jorge González (@jorgeilustra)
Historia de Alfred Nakache y Jacques Cartonnet para la Revue Dessinée. pic.twitter.com/CONstX7w6o

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Tweet by Paste Magazine on Twitter

Paste Magazine (@PasteMagazine)
.@beckycloonan illustrates @deafheavenband's "Gifts for the Earth" with grim majesty goo.gl/vYLqzg pic.twitter.com/jkzyqHWRPV

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Thursday, January 28, 2016

Links From Class 1/27/2016

https://www.pencilkings.com/category/podcast/



Tweet by Peter A. Pileggi on Twitter



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Tweet by Ian MacEwan on Twitter

Ian MacEwan (@ianmacewan)
maybe it's time again to say I really like Aama pic.twitter.com/Ylsq7z6K29

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Tweet by Jorge González on Twitter

Jorge González (@jorgeilustra)
Historia de Alfred Nakache y Jacques Cartonnet para la Revue Dessinée. pic.twitter.com/PUuVDDvJ6N

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Sunday, January 24, 2016

Spanish artist Berto Fojo’s colourful and unsettling cast of characters [feedly]



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Spanish artist Berto Fojo's colourful and unsettling cast of characters
// It's Nice That

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At first glance, the colourful characters created by Berto Fojo might appear playful but on closer inspection his creations seem troubled and ridden with angst. His images are fuelled by a dark sense of humour and an ability to create characters that have bags of charisma.

Read more


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Friday, January 22, 2016

Homework Due 1/25 - 1/26

BRING SCISSORS AND GLUE STICKS FOR THE COMING WEEK.

 

Those of you who still are not using the materials for the class THIS IS NOT OPTIONAL it is a reflection of your participation (see syllabus.) 

I do understand there are sometimes financial reasons please understand I am willing to help in those situations.

HOMEWORK FOR WEEK 3
1.Ellipse Practice!
2. Soften your block and cylinder forms
3. Stretch and squash the Block and Cylinder forms.
4. Continue copying from your library art book.

Check out this past homework link for more ideas.

Shared from Twitter: Photorealistic Drawings of Food and Candy That Challenge Viewers to Choose Between the Real and Fake Objects



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Thursday, January 21, 2016

Maurice Sendak Links from Class 1/21/2016

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/01/21/maurice-sendak-studs-terkel/

http://quirkyberkeley.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/higgledy-piggledy-pop.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-BX8Cx6ygnnM/TekXRfeD4GI/AAAAAAAAAMg/AfdMc6N9IS0/s1600/Where-The-Wild-Things-Are.jpg

http://www.harpercollinschildrens.com/harperchildrensImages/isbn/large/5/9780060287955.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_F4Amw9a3KOA/TBFI9dvkE6I/AAAAAAAAA2k/HamVrP7onHQ/s1600/night%2Bkitchen.jpg

Tell them Anything You Want


Garth Williams
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FH6ytmVVYUk/SVqRjCCvsLI/AAAAAAAAAHU/_eqRv7SSXOk/s320/tall+book+liner+notes.jpg
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-A-YDSycd6eA/Ukhqaf0mE3I/AAAAAAAAB8c/O9XlZleBZG4/s1600/TheTallBookOfMakeBelieve3.jpg
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-IUHA7wvyxek/UnnLp4cOalI/AAAAAAAA2jE/PGEhTEjnvyM/s1600/thetallbookofmakebelieve+004.png

David Lynch
https://www.brainpickings.org/2014/05/09/david-lynch-interview-ideas-creativity/
David Lynch Paintings
Eye of the Duck

William Blake (English, 1757-1827)When the Morning Stars Sang... [feedly]



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William Blake (English, 1757-1827)When the Morning Stars Sang...
// The Curve in the Line







William Blake (English, 1757-1827)

When the Morning Stars Sang Together, The Book of Job

  • 1805
  • 1821

  • 1825

More William Blake on hideback


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Manifesto of a Doer (larger) [feedly]



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Alberto Martini - Birth - Human Suffering, 1923 [feedly]



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Painting Tips: The Value of Hard and Soft Edges [feedly]



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Painting Tips: The Value of Hard and Soft Edges
// Artist's Network

Handling edges is a skill that all fine artists will need to learn sooner or later. Edges that are out of focus are vital in paintings in order to create the 3D illusion of making things look like they recede in a landscape painting, for example. Edges that are blurred make things appear they are moving.

The handling of edges is to be applied in all mediums, although some are more cooperative than others. For example, with pastels all you need to do is massage the dust with your finger and you can achieve any degree of softness, whereas in acrylics the paint dries too fast and it's impossible to blur, like with oils. Watercolor requires experience to know exactly when to apply the pigment to the wet paper.

Painting tips | Johannes Vloothuis, ArtistsNetwork.com

Painting Tips for Artists

There are three kinds of edges in all mediums:

Diffused Edges
The contour of forms can become completely lost, leaving little or no definition. Use diffused edges for the following:
• The last plane in your background, when indicating foliage
• To create ethereal cumulous clouds
• To create realistic waterfalls that appear to be moving
• To indicate crashing waves in seascapes

Soft Edges
The edge is recognizable, but blurry.
• Distant trees and evergreens in backgrounds
• Distant hills
• Things in the peripheral areas of a painting
• Water reflections

Hard Edges
Clearly defined with no sense of being out of focus.
• Rocks
• Buildings
• Rocky mountains

Advice on how to achieve soft or diffused edges:

Oil and Pastel:
Massage the paint to the degree of blurriness desired. These tow mediums are very easy.

Watercolor:
1) Apply water to the paper.
2) Wait about 5 minutes for the water to be absorbed and/or until the paper is no longer glossy.
3) Add just enough water to create pasty (not runny) pigment. If necessary suck the excess water out of the brush by squeezing the bristles where they meet the ferrule while holding the brush vertical to the paper. Note: Rough paper is more cooperative than cold-pressed paper when it comes to controlling soft edges.

Acrylic:
Scumble the adjacent color (such as the sky on the edges of trees) and lightly feather it in until the transition creates the blurred contour.


 

"Landscape Painting Essentials" and other video courses are available at NorthLightShop.com. North Light has also just released a new eBook written by Johannes titled Landscape Painting Essentials. Join his online art classes at http://improvemypaintings.com.

The post Painting Tips: The Value of Hard and Soft Edges appeared first on Artist's Network.


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Address for Success [feedly]



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Address for Success
// Muddy Colors

By Lauren Panepinto

Art Directors get a LOT of promos from artists, and I get asked often to show examples of ones that have really stood out in my memory. So after about a year or so of collecting for this post, here's a selection of some of the good ones. This maybe represents 5% of the physical promo I get mailed to me and given to me at conventions and events in a given year. Note, this is not comprehensive - if you don't see your promo here, don't despair, it doesn't mean I didn't like it, I just grabbed a good range to show.

1—Business Cards — probably the most basic piece of promo, and the most critical. You reallllly want a business card that shows you off as an artist, catches the eye, and makes an AD want to keep it around. These stand out to me as a great balance of simplicity, good use of art, legibility, and cool factor.

(credits on cards - excuse black boxes, but many artists don't put their phone number on their websites so I blocked them out here)


2—Postcards, Bookmarks, Stickers — sometimes given in addition to a business card, sometimes instead of, and the same best practices apply. Cool factor, interesting art but not too busy, legibility, etc.

(credits you can't see: Red/Suit Guy by David Palumbo. watercolor woman is Kelly McKernan, then the squid balloon is Mark Nelson. The zombie unicorn is Kari Christensen, the cthulhu tarot card is Alix Branwyn)


3—Mini Books, Mini Portfolios, Postcard Sets — kind of a mini portfolio, these can be a lot of fun, and a nice thing to produce to sell to fans, but also give away to ADs as promo pieces.







4—Creative Merchandise — fun toys, buttons, desk accessories, folded things…if they're fun they have 1000% more chance of living on an AD's desk or shelf than being lost in a pile.







5—Multimedia — a flash drive can be recommended for someone working in video or animation mostly (for just flat images it's a bit of overkill), but beyond that, the idea of using the cellophane envelopes as a way to put together a little packet is great.


6—Personal Projects — If you have an interest or a personal project, you can send that as a promo. This is a side project of Andrew Brozyna did a ton of research about book donation programs during WWII and turned it into it's own site and merch…then used it as a great promo piece to send to ADs.


7—Originals — If you're really trying to impress a few dream clients, then maybe doodle a bit on the envelopes, or leave room on the back of your postcards for sketches. ADs don't ever want to imply we want gifts, but small doodles or little originals do tend to get a lot of notice and become office decor…where we see it every day, reminding us that you're waiting for the next commission.

Jeremy Wilson sends the best mail.

Jeffrey Alan Love


Serena Malyon and Kelly McKernan

Jeremy Wilson

8—Book Design Specific — Have to give a little shout-out to the book designers and illustrators who have gone out of their way to appeal to publishing-specific ADs.



9—(Bonus Round) Thinking on your feet — Caught meeting an AD without your promo pieces? Well, if you're fast on the draw (literally, groan) you can make a business card out of anything. I was out to lunch with an artist and another artist overheard that I was an AD, came over, and handed me this. I was very impressed with his MacGyvering.



So remember, there's no hard and fast rule here, but remember to make your promo stand out it has to have great eye-catching art, it has to be legible and easy to understand, and it has to have a cool factor…either from your art or from the packaging. Or both!

Thank you to all the artists who unknowingly contributed their promo pieces to this post <3






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Expansive New Geometric Drawings Trampled in Snow and Sand by Simon Beck [feedly]



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Expansive New Geometric Drawings Trampled in Snow and Sand by Simon Beck
// Colossal

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Driven by super-human forces and undaunted by the powers of nature, artist Simon Beck (previously) trudges across sand or through knee-high snow to create massive geometric drawings left behind in his footprints. From sandy expanses on the shore of New Zealand to frigid outlooks in the Swiss Alps, any pristine surface that stretches for hundreds of meters can work as a suitable canvas for Beck's designs.

Each site-specific piece is planned well in advance on a computer and carefully mapped out on-site before the artist begins his grueling expedition. After walking for entire days, the painstaking details of enormous fractals, snowflakes, dragons, and undulating geometric forms are left in his wake—often with barely enough sunlight to snap a few quick photos.

Seen here are a number of pieces by Beck from the last year or so. You can learn about the fine details of his process in this FAQ and see additional photos over on Facebook. He also published a book of his work titled Simon Beck: Snow Art.

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Yoko Ono’s Playful and Philosophical Action-Poems About How to Live with Greater Attentiveness to the World [feedly]



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Yoko Ono's Playful and Philosophical Action-Poems About How to Live with Greater Attentiveness to the World
// Brain Pickings

"Watch a hundred-year-old tree breathe. Thank the tree in your mind for showing us how to grow and stay."


Yoko Ono's Playful and Philosophical Action-Poems About How to Live with Greater Attentiveness to the World

In 1964, artist Yoko Ono (b. February 18, 1933) published Grapefruit — a collection of her poems, drawings, and instructions for life, constituting a sort of whimsical activity book for grownups. Nearly half a century later, on the eve of her seventieth birthday, she released a sequel titled Acorn (public library) — a new set of "action poems" bearing the same sensibility of irreverence and earnestness, subversion and sincerity. Aswirl between them are Ono's distinctive dot-drawings — abstract three-dimensional shapes reminiscent of Thomas Wright's pioneering 18th-century depictions of the universe.

Fusing the playful and the philosophical, the pieces are grouped into sets according to the attentional focus of their particular activity — the sky, the city, the seasons, the home, the sounds and sights and sensations that surround us. Undergirding the poems is a robust optimism and a meditative quality that accomplishes the seemingly impossible — inviting deep reflection not through the weight of analytical reason but through the levity of intuitive insight.

SKY PIECE I

Towards the end of the Second World War, I looked like a little ghost because of the food shortage. I was hungry. It was getting easier to just lie down and watch the sky. That's when I fell in love with the sky, I think.

Since then, all my life, I have been in love with the sky. Even when everything was falling apart around me, the sky was always there for me. It was the only constant factor in my life, which kept changing with the speed of light and lightning. As I told myself then, I could never give up on life as long as the sky was there.

Tell us when you first noticed the sky.
Tell us when you first noticed that the sky was beautiful.

WATCH PIECE I

Watch a hundred-year-old tree breathe.
Thank the tree in your mind for showing us
how to grow and stay.

EARTH PIECE I

Listen to the sound of the fire burning
in the center of the globe.

SKY PIECE V

Autumn

Imagine running across a wheat field
as fast as you can.
Imagine your friend running towards you
as fast as possible.

Imagine the colour of the sky. If it's clouded,
see if there are any blue spots.
If it's clear,
see if there are any clouds.
If it's stormy,
look out for thunder and lightning.
If it's snowing,
take your coat off
so you can wrap it around your friend.

SOUND PIECE VI

Summer

Tape the sound of your baby son crying.
Let him listen to the tape when he is
going through pain as a grown man.

CLEANING PIECE II

Make a numbered list of sadness in your life.
Pile up stones corresponding to those numbers.
Add a stone each time there is sadness.
Burn the list, and appreciate the mound of stones for its beauty.

Make a numbered list of happiness in your life.
Pile up stones corresponding to those numbers.
Add a stone each time there is happiness.
Compare the mound of stones to the one of sadness.

CLEANING PIECE III

Try to say nothing negative about anybody.

a) for three days
b) for forty-five days
c) for three months

See what happens to your life.

CLEANING PIECE IV

Send a note of appreciation to silent courageous people
you happen to have noticed: parents, teachers, shopkeepers,
street cleaners, artists, etc.

Keep doing it.
See what happens to the world.

Complement the thoroughly wonderful Acorn with Wendell Berry on how to be a poet and a complete human being, then revisit John Lennon and Yoko Ono's animated conversation about love.


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